Alt Coins
  • The strong and trusted Alt Coins.
  • Popular Alt Coins.
  • Alt Coins that have good unique features or a good team behind them.
  • Cheap Alt Coins.
  • What exactly is an ICO (Initial Coin Offering).

The strong and trusted Alt Coins

Ethereum (ETH)

Ripple (XRP)

Litecoin (LTC)

Monero (XMR)

Dash (DASH)

Dogecoin (DOGE)

Ethereum (ETH)

Ripple (XRP)

Litecoin (LTC)

Monero (XMR)

Dash (DASH)

Dogecoin (DOGE)

POPULAR ALT Coins

Ethereum (ETH)

Ripple (XRP)

Litecoin (LTC)

Monero (XMR)

Dash (DASH)

Dogecoin (DOGE)

POPULAR ALT Coins

Stellar (XLM)

Chainlink (LINK)

Cardano (ADA)

Alt Coins that have good unique features or a good team behind them

Alt Coins that have good unique features or a good team behind them

Dash (DASH)

Tether (USDT)

NEO (NEO)

Ripple (XRP)

Cheap Alt Coins

Cheap Alt Coins

Steem (STEEM)

Bytecoin (BCN)

Siacoin (SC)

Dogecoin (DOGE)

DigiByte (DGB)

Cheap Alt Coins

Steem (STEEM)

Bytecoin (BCN)

Siacoin (SC)

Dogecoin (DOGE)

DigiByte (DGB)

Stablecoins

Tether (USDT) is one of the first stablecoins, it’s backed by the United States dollar and is used by over 94% of all stablecoin trading volume.

Trust Token (TUSD) is looking to be more transparent than Tether is and has partnered with an accounting group to consistently monitor the asset.

UCD Coin (USDC) is issued by regulated financial institutions, and backed by fully reserved assets, and redeemable on a 1:1 basis for US dollars.

Goldcoin (GOLD) is the first fractionalized gold-backed asset available for purchase directly in national currencies or cryptocurrency.

Paxos Standard Token (PAX) Paxos Standard Token, otherwise known as PAX, was built as an aside to Tether. The asset is also backed by the US dollar, and the fiat is held in government-controlled treasuries.

Binance USD (BUSD) BinanceUSD (BUSD) is a stablecoin put into place by the Binance exchange itself. BUSD is also held in FDIC-insured banks in the US and is used to help pay for trading fees on the exchange.

What exactly is an ICO (Initial Coin Offering)

When a new cryptocurrency firm is starting up they sometimes need funding to complete the project, so this is where initial coin offering (ICO) come in.

As part the ICO, the cryptocurrency firm will produce a white paper, this is their projects plan and will include what the project hopes to complete, what fund are need to complete each stage, how long or when they expect to complete each stage and what rewards might be had or project price.

On the ICO launch generally public investors are expected to invest real money into the project, and in return the investors get tokens, however some projects accept major Cryptocurrency such as Bitcoin. These tokens are usually exchanged into the new cryptocurrency once the project is complete and the new cryptocurrency is live.

Investors are encouraged to invest in the hope that their investment is worth more later when it launches.

For example; in 2014 Ethereum used the ICO method and raised $18m in funds at a rate of 40c per Ether token. When Ethereum went live in 2015 the value of Ethereum was $14 per Ethereum.

In 2017 Ethereum has been worth $370+ at its high points and in 2021 has reached $1,664.

Possible reasons why some countries do not like ICO’s could be because it allows a cryptocurrency to jump straight in with value at the time of launch, this is due to money already heavily invested in the currency giving it value from the start.

This happens in the stock market for new float, but is often the reserve of sophisticated investors, so retail investors can’t, so maybe that’s the issue governments have issue with the Crypto ICO’s.

Also, maybe because some ICO’s may never complete the project and you do risk your investment being lost. However, the same risk could be said of the various Kickstarter websites where the projects never materialise or the admin runs off with the money.

Some countries may also think that cryptocurrencies weaken the value of their own local currency as people move money into cryptos. However recently Crypto was accepted by one government over their own currency as it wasn’t devaluing.

But there are probably more reasons why some countries may not adopt this new form of currency, but I think each country should embrace this new age with cryptocurrencies rather than fight it.

DISCLAIMER: This is a guide based on my experiences with Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies and is not an endorsement of the goods or services mentioned in this guide. This is not legal advice or financial advice and any investments you make in cryptocurrencies are at your own risk and you should seek advice from a professional financial or legal advisor. The author has tried to make the guide as accurately as possible at the time of writing, and takes no responsibility for the information given in this guide.

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